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Emergency Responses at Glen Canyon

On May 31, 2001, Reclamation's Glen Canyon Dam Powerplant responded to a Stage III power emergency in California. Generation was increased by about 135 megawatts above the preschedule. This response occurred at about 1415 hours. Peak releases reached about 16,000 cfs, about 3,000 cfs over the prescheduled maximum daily release. The additional energy delivered on May 31 was paid back on June 9, 2001.

Tuesday, May 8 @ 3:30 PM (MAST) through Wednesday, May 9 @ 2:00 AM (MAST) - Energy delivered into California for the day(s) totaled 2,103 MWh. Water released with this energy delivery totaled approximately 4,443 AF. Maximum hourly energy delivery was 300 MW hours 4 PM through 6 PM. Maximum release down river was approximately 19,561 c.f.s. during those same hours. Scheduled releases for that period was 11,900 c.f.s. or approximately 7,404 c.f.s. above the daily 6,000 c.f.s. maximum ramp restriction. This also is estimated.

Monday, May 7 @ 4:00 PM (MAST) through Tuesday, May 8 @ 4:00 AM (MAST) - Energy delivered into California totaled 3,181 MWH for the day(s). Water released with this delivery totaled approximately 6,720 AF. Maximum hourly delivery was 350 MW during hours 4 PM through 7 PM. Maximum c.f.s. release down river was approximately 20,838 c.f.s. during those same hours. Scheduled release during that same time period was 11,900 c.f.s. which brings c.f.s. flows 8,681 c.f.s. over the daily 6,000 c.f.s. maximum fluctuation rate. This is an estimated flow and not yet coordinated with the gage at Glen.

A total of 5,374 megawatt hours was delivered to California on these two days. The additional water released above that prescheduled totaled 11,200 acre-feet. The additional energy delivered was paid back by the California ISO the week of May 14. On-peak generation was reduced by approximately 100 megawatts (approximately 2,400 cfs) from prescheduled values on 4 consecutive days, May 14 through May 17.

On March 19, 2001, and again on March 20, 2001, Reclamation's Glen Canyon Dam Powerplant responded to a Stage III power emergency in California. Generation was increased by about 300 megawatts above that scheduled on both days. On March 19, the response occurred at 1130 hours MST and lasted until 2100 hours MST. Peak releases of approximately 20,200 cfs from Glen Canyon Dam occurred. This was 6,700 cfs over the prescheduled maximum daily release of 13,500 cfs. On March 20, 2001, the response occurred at 1600 hours MST and lasted until 2100 hours MST. The peak releases on March 20, 2001 was 21,090 cfs, 7,590 cfs over the prescheduled maximum daily release.

On February 15, 2001, Reclamation's Glen Canyon Dam Powerplant responded to a Stage III power emergency in California. This resulted in releases of 21,200 cfs between 1200 and 1300 hours. Releases of approximately 20,000 cfs were made throughout the afternoon as emergency assistance continued. Late in the afternoon (approximately 1700 hours), a 1,500 cfs per hour downramp was initiated and maintained until pre-scheduled releases of 8,500 cfs were reached in the early morning hours of February 16, 2001. The 21,200 cfs release was about 6,700 cfs over the pre-scheduled peak release for the day, which was 14,500 cfs.

Monday, September 18, 2000 California power demands exceeded their available supplies (including requests for power outside their immediate control areas). This surge in demand was caused by abnormally high weather temperatures. California's power demand peaked in the afternoon and blackouts became imminent. The criteria established in response to a Presidential directive were met, including evidence that no additional power supplies were available. This directive mandates that federal power generation facilities take all possible measures to maximize power importation into California under those circumstances. As a result, Glen Canyon Dam generation was increased by about 330 megawatts, about 8,300 cfs, to a total of about 655 megawatts or 16,300 cfs. The magnitude of this increase was limited by available transmission capacity into California. The duration of this emergency release was about 4 hours, after which releases were reduced by the 1,500 cfs/hour downramp rate allowed by the Glen Canyon Dam EIS Record of Decision.

 

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